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Looking back on 2015, there have been a lot of things going on with Servant Energy 2016respect to the energy business and how it affects different industry sectors, as well certain areas like my home state of Texas! Natural gas prices lumbered at historical lows and with oil prices still on a downward spiral since June 2014, into the $36.00 range, some analysts predict that prices could fall below $30.00. Consumers have been able to benefit from the price drop at the pump, while some oil companies have started to feel the heat from declining oil prices.

In Texas, construction is finishing the year off strong, especially in the DFW area, where we continue to see a significant rise in construction and job creation. Houston, although not able to keep up the pace it had for the last few years, still has cranes in the air and new developments are coming online. Driving around the DFW area, cranes have been popping up all over town due to the construction of corporate relocations, office buildings, multifamily buildings, mixed use, and manufacturing additions. This has been a great sign for DFW! The construction companies and developers are enjoying some good times that can hopefully last another two to three years.

While these construction companies and large building owners continue to build, their power needs become great and more complex. Getting power for projects is not just a cost of doing business; it really is a way to more effectively managing the project by planning ahead of time. My firm, Servant Energy Partners, truly believes that by involving power needs at the beginning of the construction process a company can save large amounts of time and costs, plus add savings to the bottom line. Our firm takes the approach that every project is unique. Finding out time frames, challenges, and the load can help a company put a road map plan in place, ensuring that power is ready and available when needed for the project. Additionally, ensuring that there is a long term process in place to handle the power needs for the duration of the project, all the way through transition to the ownership group.

Servant Energy Partners, which includes a team of skilled former utility personnel, helps our construction, developer, and building owner’s partners through the process, so they will have peace of mind when they start a project and ensure that they will be prepared to handle any challenges and obstacles that may arise. All while saving money on the power they use. We have been fortunate to be a part of some of the largest projects in the DFW area in 2015, including State Farm (Austin Commercial), Raytheon Headquarters (A & P), Parkland Hospital (BARA), and Liberty Mutual (Balfour Beatty). What a blessing and a pleasure it has been to be involved in these projects.

Our goal, at Servant Energy Partners, has always been to serve our clients and help them save on the energy. As our 2015 journey is coming to an end, we want to thank all of our partners who have help make our 5th year in business a year of exciting growth and rewards, both personally and professionally. We hope that you will allow us to help you on your journey, as your energy partner in the coming years. “Power Up for 2016” and Beyond!

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There will be high demands made on the grid by the hot weather and there are things everyone can do to help conserve power during peak hours. The following are just a few small steps we can make a difference:

1. Turn of all unnecessary lights, appliances, and electronic equipment
2. When at home, close blinds and drapes that get direct sunlight, set air-conditioning thermostats to 78 degrees or higher and use fans
3. When leaving the home set air condition thermostats to 85 degrees and turn off all fans. Block the sun by closing blinds or drapes with direct sunlight.
4. Do not use dishwasher, laundry equipment, hair dryers, coffee makers, or other home appliances during the peak hours of 3 to 7pm.
5. Avoid opening refrigerators or freezers than necessary.
6. Use microwaves for cooking instead of electric range or ovens.
7. Set your pool pump to run in the early morning or evening instead of the afternoon.

We can all do our part to conserve on energy, lessen the demand on power, and insure that the rolling power blackouts we’ve had in the past are a thing of the past. Please email rduron@servantenergy.com if you need power for you facility or need an energy partner for your firm. Here to Serve!

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Your employees’ behavior can make the difference between whether your company’s energy strategy produces outstanding results or insignificant savings.

Four elements common to each of the efforts:
1. Leadership Set the Tone. Upper management led by example, set the tone with strong commitments to the programs and solid branding.

2. Programs Involved Strong Teams. In addition to green teams, programs featured a project committee and participation by peer champions.

3. Smart Use of Communication Tools. Programs reached out to their target audience through multiple channels: emails, websites, public meetings, posters and other visual prompts, like stickers.

4. Use of Multiple Engagement Techniques. Programs connected with building occupants through a variety of techniques to engage interest and motivate employees and tenants toward greener behavior. Feedback, benign peer pressure, competition and rewards were among the techniques used most frequently.
“Most notable is the degree to which the support of upper management, which is strongly stressed in all of the reviewed cases, proves to be critical to the development and success of an energy behavior program in the workplace,” Bin said in the report.

People tend to focus on individual efforts that are often related to purchasing — such as buying CFL bulbs or energy-efficient appliances — instead of considering that enormous savings can be reaped from broad-based energy-saving strategies with a systems approach, the report notes.
U.S. could reduce energy consumption by more than 50 percent, save consumers more than $300 billion a year, and add nearly two million jobs by 2050 by following “a more productive investment pattern” that includes consideration of industrial processes and improvement to infrastructure.

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Most Americans aren’t doing enough to stop their homes from being energy hogs.
People have to do more — at least four energy efficiency improvements — to make a real impact on their utility bills. Unfortunately, Americans aren’t reaching that magic number, even though the government and utilities have spent hundreds of millions of dollars to get them to act.”
Most energy conserving behaviors and home improvement activities dropped significantly from last year” and now are more in line with percentages from 2008 and 2009.
Researchers looked at more than a dozen improvements and behavior changes from simply turning off lights and using less energy during peak periods to having a home energy audit. Activity fell in each category this year with respondents doing a mere 2.6 things on average to reduce energy consumption — which was not enough to lower electricity bills.
Oddly, the drop in energy-saving improvements and activity occurred even though Americans seem to be somewhat more aware that their homes need work and that their energy costs are increasing. This year, 23 percent said their homes were inefficient compared to 14 percent in 2010.
There is a reason there is a gap between perception and behavior:
• Denial. “Most Americans continue to live in denial about their energy consumption,” the report said. Despite doing less to save energy, 71 percent of respondents said they believe they are using the same amount or less energy than they did five years ago. Twenty-six percent said they were using more, and 3 percent said they didn’t know.
• A high-tolerance for bill increases. Fifty-eight percent said their utility bill would have to increase by more than $75 a month before they’d consider spending money on energy improvements. On average, respondents said it would take an increase of $112 to spur them to action and those is not a certainty give variables that can affect a bill.
• Costs. The people who most need to make energy efficient improvements are the least able to make them. Those who can better afford to spend money on home improvements were more sensitive to bill increases” and were more likely to make changes that would reduce costs. That is usually the ones that are acting.
• Misplaced priorities. “Consumers continue to prioritize the wrong things as you can see from the lack of home energy audits. Home energy audits continue to be the colonoscopy of energy efficiency. Everyone should get one, but too few actually go through with it. This year, 15 percent said they had an energy audit done on their home, compared to 20 percent last year. Only a third said they think an audit is necessary and of those people close to half said they might get one done.
The federal government should take the hundreds of millions of dollars that’s currently fragmented into best-practices tests, block grants and pilot programs all over the country and pool the money into one big pot. Then design a big national education effort to encourage Americans to take the most important four or five steps necessary to see a real reduction in their utility bills. There needs to be incentive that both creates people to act as well as results that they can look forward to.

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